Relativistic rotation processes may cause implosion of a dying star to bounceback as a supernova explosion
(An answer to a question in Wikipedia's [17] list of unsolved problems in physics
What is the exact mechanism by which an implosion of a dying star becomes an explosion?)


 TITLE: Energy accumulation in relativistic sub-Bohr orbitals, Franklins relativistic rotation of quarks and gravitational field bounceback as processes relevant to explosion of supernovae
 AUTHOR: Ben-Amots, N.
 SOURCE: J. Phys.: Conf. Ser., v. 615, 012012 (2015)
 ABSTRACT: We discuss exploding stars exceeding 8 MSun. Supernova processes start with implosion before the explosion. The processes causing implosion are relatively well understood. Not so the processes that reverse the implosion into explosion. We propose and discuss three possible processes that can reverse implosion of a star into an explosion, causing supernova:
a) Energy accumulation in sub-Bohr electron orbitals populated by an electron moving at high relativistic velocities [1],
b) Franklins relativistic rotation of quarks [2], [3] and
c) Einsteins gravitational field bounceback [4].
The relativistic sub-Bohr orbitals are derived by using an analogy to exponential gravitation (recent refs [1], [4], [5], [6], [7] and [8]).

 SUMMARY: We suggested various processes that alone or together may stop implosion of a star and cause its explosion, (i) First possibility: The [51+(n-1)51.5]MeV set of sub-Bohr relativistic electron orbitals around a proton accumulates and then releases energy. The accumulated energy is significant at temperature greater than 61011Ko (corresponding to 51MeV.) (ii) The compressed massive gravitational field during implosion is an additional accumulator of energy, which is then released causing bounceback. (iii) Quenching of quark rotation of nucleons as a source of energy additional to the accumulated energies of 1 and 2.



 COMMENT: Lectured 13 June 2014 in IARD2014 Conference, Storrs, CT, USA

 38 references:

[1] Ben-Amots, N., "Relativistic exponential gravitation and exponential potential of electric charge," Found. Phys., v. 37, pp. 773-787 (2007) link
[2] Franklin, P., "The meaning of rotation in the special theory of relativity,"
Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, v. 8, pp. 265-268 (1922)
[3] Ben-Amots, N., "Basic aspect of relativistic rotation: Franklin rotation of a sphere,"
Found. Phys., v. 33, pp. 1369-1372 (2003) link
[4] Ben-Amots, N., J. Phys., "Some features and implications of exponential gravitation,"
Conf. Series, v. 330 012017 (2011) link
[5] Majernik, V., "Energy conservation at the gravitational collapse" (2006)
arXiv:astro-ph/0609313
[6] Majernik, V., Phys. Essays, "An alternative to classical naked singularity and black hole,"
v. 22, pp. 413-419 (2009)
[7] Walker C., "Calculation of gravitational potential by the method of multiple redshifts" (2010)
http://sites.google.com/site/revisingnewton
[8] Walker C., "Newtonian potential and the Einstein equivalence principle,"
Foundational Questions Context (2012)
http://www.fqxi.org/data/essay-contest-files/Walker shells.pdf
[17] Wikipedia (Retrieved 2013) List of unsolved problems in physics: Supernovae:
What is the exact mechanism by which an implosion of a dying star becomes an explosion?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unsolved_problem_in_physics

and more 29 references

Fulltext


FROM THE PREFACE OF THE PROCEEDINGS:
"phenomenological discussion of supernova mechanics"

AUTHOR'S COMMENTS (not included in the paper):

Back to home page

Back to home page